A BBCOR Certified Baseball Bat, Because the World Needs More Acronyms

by nessel on August 16, 2011

Easton Power Brigade Bat BBCOR certified

As a Dad,  I am an expert on baseball.  Don’t believe me?  Here let me prove it… Did you know that in the Major Leagues they use wooden bats,  but in high school and college they use aluminum bats?  Okay fine, maybe that is not super impressive, but how about this – starting in 2012 high school and college players will need to use BBCOR certified bats to create a  more even playing field across all level.  I will give you a moment to pick your jaw up off the ground.

What does BBCOR Mean and Why Should I Care?

BBCOR stands for Batted Ball Coefficient Of Restitution and starting January 1, 2012 all bats used in NCAA games and National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) games will need to be BBCOR certified.   In layman’s terms – they want aluminum bats to have the same performance factors as wood bats and BBCOR certified bats will act more like wooden bats.

In terms of why you should care – well, if you have kids who play baseball at a high school or college level, they will need to get used to new bats and their performance come the start of 2012.  BBCOR bats will not be generally available until the Fall, but Sports Authority is offering an exclusive pre-sale of Easton Power Brigade Bats. We got our hands on an Easton Power Brigade Bat and did this quick video review…

Just Like A Wooden Bat, Without the Shattering

I have to say, there is still something so satisfying about going out and smashing a baseball with a fine bat.  The BBCOR certified bat that we tested out was the Easton BB11X3 Power Brigade XL3 bat.   While I am no Babe Ruth, I do know a fine bat when I see one and this was a mighty fine bat.   A nice sweet spot and the bat just feels right in your hands.

The Easton Power Brigade XL3 actually has an extra-long barrel design, which gives the bat its large sweet spot.  The bat has a THT100™ scandium alloy barrel for greater durability, and it’s paired with an ultra-thin 31/32-inch handle for maximum power through the hitting zone.

Tip – Only Buy Your High School or College Aged Son a Bat That is BBCOR Certified

One of the things we like to do here at DadDoes.com is provide reviews and information that can help parents make informed buying decisons and save them from wasting their money.  Given the 2012 requirement for BBCOR certification, it would be a huge waste of money to buy a bat today that is NOT BBCOR certified.

For the month of August, only Sports Authority is carrying the Easton Power Brigade BBCOR certified bats.  So, if you are looking to get your son (or daughter) a new bat this summer, it really makes sense to pick up a BBCOR certified bat from Sports Authority.

Any Major League Teams Looking for a Player With Mad Skills?

The Easton Power Brigade bat has such a nice feel to it, and a massive sweet spot, I am starting to revisit my dreams of playing in the Major Leagues.  Maybe it’s not to late for me – couple more weeks of practicing with an aluminum bat that has wooden bat like performance and I should be well on my way.   Now I just need to find a team that has a need for a 43 year old Dad,  who is well past his prime (that he never really had) and brings unlimited injury potential to the table.

More Information:

The Easton Power Brigade XL3 BBCOR certified bat sells for $199 and in August is available exclusively from Sports Authority

Read more about BBCOR certification

View our video review of the Easton Power Brigade Bat – BBCOR certified

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  • Mary Ann

    With kids not yet high school age, I had no idea of the regulations in place — every few years there’s a story in the local paper about a high schooler injured on the baseball field, glad to know someone’s looking into safety (and I also had no idea how expensive bats can be!, better not let the kids outgrow that whiffle bat).

  • Mjhyperdunk

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